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not be specific to one disease or organ system but could benefit everything, new ways of doing science. since i came out of the genoa genome project, always looking for examples like that. that is a great and wonderful, exciting thing to be able to do, to be able to try to steer this massive ship in a direction that will have the greatest public benefit in the shortest time. >> two years ago, i did interview with christopher hitchens. it may have been close to his last. he died later. i want to run this clip. [video clip] collins, who did the human genome project, and who under budget, we are on opposite sides of the religious debate. we became friends. we became friendly debaters, and he has taken a very kindly interest in my case and has helped me have my genome sequenced to look for a more perfect, identifiable match for a mutation that is peculiar to me. >> how did you become friends? >> as christopher said, we started out as debating about the topic of science and faith. are these world views compatible? for me, they are. as a believer, the opportunity to do science and see god's hands in
, urs, and i will introduce the science who led that team and acted as the consultant to recommend the design criteria and the dvs led the consulting to the tjpa to make sure that the recommendations coming from urs, were reasonable and prudent. and did not not over or under address, the concerns and the nature of the facility and more appropriate for the nature of the facility. widening the associates and specializes in particular, on structural and blast analysis, and vehicle force protection. they have one in 64 years of experience, in that arena since experience with federal laboratories, courthouses embassies, as well as working on the pentagon and many of the same facilities in the city of new york, where dvs has addressed general security issues. they have focused on blast and force protection on those facilities. also as part of the peer review and consulting team to tjpa is code consultants ink. cci, and they focus particularly on fire protection and fire life safety issues and were extensively involved in the peer review of the bus fire and train fire scenarios, designed
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of science, vision, money, and an abundance of ego. >> i just wanted the biggest boat. let's admit it. >> it's ego. what? i mean... >> do i have an ego? yes. >> if there were a hall of fame for business tycoons, tom perkins would be a first-ballot shoo-in. he has earned a fortune, and, boy, does he know how to spend it. [ engine revs, tires screech ] >> the troubles at hewlett-packard started when then-c.e.o. carly fiorina was abruptly fired. >> out the door. is that really -- it was that cold? >> that's exactly what happened. >> devastated? you had to have been. >> of course i was devastated. i was hurt. >> welcome to "60 minutes on cnbc." i'm lesley stahl. in this edition, we examine the boardroom intrigue at hewlett-packard between 2005 and 2007. it was a tumultuous saga that led to criminal charges, executive firings, accusations of sexism, and lots and lots of finger-pointing. and in the midst of it all, three of the protagonists told me their sides of the story -- pattie dunn, thomas perkins, and carly fiorina. we begin with pattie dunn. it was 2005, and she was appointed chairman of h
golden age this span of the 17th century where trade, industry and science were among the world. the one small port of amsterdam were one of the commercial centers in the entire world. this concentration of capital enriched bankers and merchants but also created the society in europe. the arch of the dutch golden age. 17th century travelers visiting holland remarked on the number of artist. typically western european artist on the monarch and the nobility as well as the very wealthie catholic church. an open market to a wide clientele that arranged from variety of merchants. it displays a modern domestic rather than extravagant or royal setting which it was carried. emily who is the director of the morris house. the expansion which i will talk about in an a little bit will give it more space. for the collection there is a limited pictures they can acquire but too large for the building. so where do the paintings come from? how can they be there. this is an exceptional and remarkable museum. this splendid 17th century city palace was constructed between 1633-1634 next to the dutch gove
very interested in the idea of the kind of crosscurrent of science, engineeringnd architecture and art that all come together that looks at patterning quite well. it looks an is a narrative to key into the bay area. all of the areas have similar underlying values and if that narrative is built into building it could become quite powerful. it's also a series of dots and there is a great range in how one might render the building to start to the developed. let me pass down the materials and colors we are looking at. so the first piece that you see here is clear anodized aluminum in the pen rows pattern. that is an 18 inch square. the panel itself is roughly the size of two of those boards. so that panel is '116 of the whole panel exterior wall. there are no curves in these panels but the way the panels are motion to dismiss motion -- the panel will be '3'18 inch square. the panel itself is roughly the size of two of those boards. so that panel is '116 of the whole panel exterior wall. there are no curves in these panels but the way the panels are -- the panel will be '316 of an inch t
incubator, and make room for the next big idea-- like enbio, a materials science company, also launched from university college dublin. the startup is pioneering new treatments for metals that won a contract for the heatshields on the european space agency's orbiter heading to the sun in the coming years. karl flannery, who started his own tech services company storm technologies during the boom years, is worried about a talent shortage in ireland. he wants more emphasis on science and mathematics education for irish kids, and an open door to bright young people like chugh from everywhere. >> we're looking at short-term, medium-term, long-term. we're going to change how we change work permits for non- irish national, so that will help bring in a lot more skilled computer science people into the irish economy. that will help bring in a lot more qualified, skilled computer science into the irish economy. >> suarez: but to have a healthy domestic economy, ireland can't just create great jobs for manipulating data on microchips. there's a role for potato chips too. this family has been growing p
. [laughter] i go to school for nursing some go to premed or sciences but don't you feel it makes sense to learn basic human anatomy that is the essential to a medical profession or even if you study biology? >> you are going into use surgery if you are fresh out of medical school or the bears watching 20 years? i would take the nurse. there is background and knowledge that is handy absolutely but the idea that comes from the classroom should be changed and we should spend more time being practical in the real world. >> that makes sense but if you don't have the background knowledge and you just know what you'd do by experiencing these firsthand that means you don't know how to fix your mistakes because he did and get the basic technical knowledge at school. >> my challenge is is the best way to sit in the classroom paying exorbitant amounts of money or could we get back more efficiently? john: next person. >> ideas graduated from school in indiana but is the engineering degree in human studies just as valid? it is not the same thing where does that misconception come from? to make sure
be contributing this as well. >> so far he has already come out on education, immigration and on science. >> and it's really smart. >> one of the reports had a long time gop guy getting involved. >> watch out for the google glasses. the legislator says it's like wearing a computer. it's dangerous and similar to texting and driving chblt. >> i haven't signed up. you remember that science project thing? get away from him to do this. you know, the geeks are very excited. i'm hesitant about people driving with anything on their face that doesn't have to be there. i can understand it. maybe it will make people better drivers. >> maybe this would help for gps. i have a gps that is on the dash. it could be easier. at the end of the day, people are so distracted. you don't need another distraction. >> i agree. the less that is distracting you the better. >> amazon studios adding zom beeland to prime instant video. >> what amazon is doing is interesting. they will put them on. anyone can watch them and give comments and vote on which of these pilots you want to see developed into full series. and
to do that? >> we're not telling them at all. we're telling them what science says is or isn't in their interest. we allow you to smoke. we just don't let you smoke where other people have to breathe the smoke that you -- that you're exhaling or comes from your cigarette. the same thing with obesity which incidentally is a public interest because we're going to spend $5 billion on treating people of 0 obesity in our hospitals in new york city alone this year. but regardless -- >> where is the line? where is it too far for government to go? >> i do not think we should ban most things. i do think there are certain times we should infringe on your freedom and that is, for example, if you're drinking we shouldn't let you drive because you'll kill somebody else. if you are carrying a gun, we shouldn't let you on an airplane. there's a lot of things that we do -- if there's asbestos in the classroom we should remove the kids from classroom until you clean the air. if you want to own a gun, i certainly think it's constitutionally protected. you certainly have a right to have a gun i
the red carpet" from the discovery science center in orange county. i'm rachel smith. we're here to check out this amazing exhibit on indiana jones and the adventures of archeologist. there are costumes, props and so much more from all four indy movies. while we take a look around, let's talk some new movies. otrc's karl schmid is on the red carpet for "olympus has fallen." >> rachel, this hollywood red carpet has been in serious lockdown tonight for the premiere of gerard butler and morgan freeman's latest film "olympus has fallen," all about the white house being taken down by terrorists. and with real secret service agents sweeping the carpet before the stars arrived, was gerard worried about how it was received? >> i've got to be honest, i was nervous. they loved it! they laughed at the right bits, they gapsed, they applauded. they went crazy for it. >> the movie deals with terrorism, so how did the stars make sure the sensitive subject matter was handled carefully but still entertained? >> the unseen heroes they make us safe he have single day. >> you don't give away too many secrets
of desperation. we pray for those with illnesses that medical science cannot cure. we pray for those in whom hate has become malignant and those in whom hope has died. bless our fair city and its leadership. bless our governor, and give strength to our president barack obama. this is our prayer in jesus' name, amen. >>> amen. (applause) >> lift every voice and sing till earth and heaven ring, ring with the harmonies of liberty. let our rejoicing rise high as the listening skies. let it resound loud as the rolling sea. sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us. sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us. facing the rising sun of our new day begun, let us march on till victory is won. stony the road we trod, bitter the chasening rod, felt in the day when hope unborn had died. yet with a steady beat has not our weary feet come to the place that our father's died. we have come over the way that with tears has been watered. we have come treading the path of the blood of the slaughtered. out of the gloomy past, till we now stand at last, with a white gleam of our
to by william shakespeare's plays and poems. located near the academy of sciences, shakespeare's garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring and wild flower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil little garden tucked behind the path of a charming rot iron gate with romantic magic. the overarching cherry trees, the gorgeous big walkway and brick wall, the benches, the rustic sun dial. the pack picnic, lovely bench, enjoy the sunshine and soft breeze and let the >>> all right. every year we come out to celebrate arbor day in the month of march and i'm happy to kickoff this year arbor day here at this special location. joined with us today we have several guest. i know dan is here, larry stringer is here and our colleagues and our partners in arbor day. today like many other days, trees will be dedicated in someone who has contributed to san francisco either through their work or given back to the environment through culture, through arts and through many of the hard work and we will unveil who will receive this dedication today. as many of you know trees are very i
francisco. also background in earth and space sciences and environmental law. i'm also aware of the energy crisis of the 1970s and as a result i hear that clean energy is too expensive and we need to put it off. i'm very heart end to support this clean energy proposal. but i'm also within my lifetime the carbon dioxide atmosphere has gone up over 20 percent. i was talking with my students just this morning about that. in other, in the current levels of carbon dioxide are currently above the scenarios that scientist concluded about a decade ago. i hope we go with this in a robust speed. it will front load jobs and support. nor in order for that to happen the rates need to be lower. the reallocation of funds to keep those rates as low as possible to get the demand there and the jobs going and keep the community strong. i also really support the strong tariffs that i was hearing discussed that was what pushed germany and other european countries to have some of the largest renewable and once those tariffs are kicked in and will help move up much faster. another thing you will look at is ki
an open science grid computer or a free electron laser and the string theory research being done here is nothing but a dead end. excuse me, that is my research and it is by no means a dead end. well, obviously you don't see it yet but trust me, you will. gablehauser: dennis, we've discussed this. we're in the process of updating our equipment, and we welcome your input on our research goals and we've agreed to look the other way if you want to use up to 20% of the grant money you attract to smuggle your grandfather out of pyongyang. we want him here, boys. make it happen. yes, sir.
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of science degree in engineering from princeton and its masters of science from stanford. -- has d salgado is served as senior counter of the computer crime intellectual property section. as a federal prosecutor, he specialized in investigating and prosecuting computer network cases such as computer hacking, illegal computer wiretaps, denial of service attacks, and other technology-driven privacy crime. he graduated from the university of mexico and received his law degree from yale law school. each of you will be recognized for five minutes without objection. you're full written statement will appear in the record after your statement has been completed. also without objection, all members' alta misstatements will be placed in the record, as well. is first.ngiel >> thank you. chairman sensenbrenner, ranking member scott, and members of the subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to testify on behalf of the department of justice regarding the electronic communications privacy act -- ecpa. this topic is particularly important to the department because of the wide-ranging -- department.
at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> good morning. i am heather cheryleds. >> i am heather nauert. hope you all had a great weekend. it is march the 25th. thank you for watching "fox & friends first". the top five stories making news at this hour. a big rig driver claiming he is the seoul winner of the $338 million power baltic et. the oren of loves travel stops says the man called the store last night and told him his life had changed and asked how he could collect the big prize. later this morning at 10:00 a.m. we hear lottery officials may hear the truck drivers identity at a news conference planned. >> recent renovations at birmingham airport are being investigated after a sign collapsed killing a 10-year-old boy. the family flying home from vacation winning when a 300 pound flight panel fell on them. the mother is still unconscious. two other sons also hurt. only one remains hospitalized. >> amanda knox. remember that name? a legal nightmare in italy is finally over. you may have missed the story. this is what's happenin
, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it's like each city, you're talking about 3,000, 5,000 miles of pipe. so you have to prioritize where they can go and fix the system. narrator: each city faces unique situations, so they must determine the asset management approach that best addresses these challenges. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset to
projects. i have a computer science degree from stanford and i have a business degree as well. i've worked on a variety of large scale project management at google including our company-wide financial audits that we did and the $5 billion bid to buy spectrum. i launched a project to build [speaker not understood] at home in one american city. and most recently i was a judge on the bloomberg mayor's challenge. i have deep ties with the community technology here in san francisco. i joined google in 2002 which makes me a bit of a dinosaur at google, but i have a lot of colleague now who are in the tech community and ex-classmates who are now at twitter and yelp and [speaker not understood]. and i'm here applying today mostly because i love san francisco. i've lived here most of my adult life. i reese presidently became a homeowner and i intend to raise my family here and i feel this is a way to give back to my community. i did a survey of my life and decided i wanted to do more in volunteering. i've been asking people about commissions. i decided this commission was of the
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degrees in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. in the u.s., 76% of all registered -- from the top, from the top 10% producing. they come from foreign students. foreign students here in the u.s. who then become inventors. these foreign-born inventors are driving economic prosperity with the consequences of their background in these hard sciences. in our current system, we welcome foreign students to the united states. we provide them the world's best education, and then we send them home so that they can compete against us. and, frankly, this makes no sense. america's current involvement in asia must not be confined by the same old approaches that may have once served a purpose, but for now woefully outdated. indeed, we must harness the full potential of american ingenuity to address the spectrum of challenges we have before us. and this is out build samsung in the aftermath of the korean war. and much like the mythical phoenix rising from the ashes, south korea and samsung are today truly world class. together, we can ensure that the future legacy of ame
for nursing and i have a lot of students who are going to school for pre-med or the sciences and don't you feel like it makes sense for somebody to go to school and learn basic human anatomy and all of these other classes it's sort of essential to a medical profession or even if you are going to study biology? >> image if you are going into surgery and you were given the choice of being operated on by someone fresh out of medical school or the nurse who has been watching for 20-years. i would rather have the nurse. there is background knowledge that is handy to have while you are operating on someone but the idea that all of that comes from the classroom i think should be changed we should spend a lot more time being practical in the real world. >> that makes sense but at the same time if you don't have that background knowledge and you just know what you do, sure you have been experiencing these things first hand but that doesn't mean you know what happens if you do something slightly wrong. you don't know how to fix your mistakes because you didn't get the basic technical knowledge that
surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. glass on floors. daily chores. for the little mishaps you feel use neosporin to help you heal. it kills germs so you heal four days faster. neosporin. use with band-aid brand bandages. >>> people are already lining up outside the supreme court building in washington trying to get front row seats to legal history. the court takes up same-sex marriage in less than two days. justices will hear arguments for the first case tuesday involving california's proposition 8 ban on same-sex marriage. the second case centers on the defense of marriage act which defines marriage as between a man and a woman. as the supreme court prepares to tackle that issue, same-sex couples across the country are watching. cnn's joe johns has a story of a couple, one couple in the d.c. area, who are hoping history will be made. >> reporter: the battle over same-sex marriage in california has been going on for years, and coming up this week it finally arrives at the u.s. supreme court. we talked to one of the couples involved in
are considering a metal skin for the structure with a math or science base pattern that would be educational. by the way the new transit hub is scheduled to open in 2017. >>> time now 5:25. let's see how things are moving right now. sal, how are we looking? >> we are doing pretty well. we are off to an easy start. we never want to have any big problems. this morning we are getting cooperation from the freeways northbound 280 as you drive through there. also the manage commute is moving on very nicely. now back to steve. >>> 30s and 40s and some 50- degree temps on some of the lows. we are getting more of a westerly breeze. for some it's chilly to cold for others it's not that bad. 50 hayward. and also oakland. patchy low clouds as well. a lot of high clouds but mostly sun today. 50s and 60s or low 70s. >>> time now 5:26 the big that will event you. fulness plus camped out for a california's history. proposition 8 finally makes it to the u.s. supreme court. >>> we are live in san jose where police need your help tracking down a killer. >>> welcome back. this is ktvu channel 2 morning news it'
. medical science is leading the way with breakthrough technology. tonight, cramer's kicking off a week-long series highlighting some of the most revolutionary companies that maybe heading higher. be heading higher. >>> when the market was really getting hammered earlier today, and of course last week courtesy of the european woes, i came back to the question i always ask whenever the averages get whacked by some supposedly terrifying exogenous event. nobody likes the way the europeans are dealing with cyprus ordeal with anything for that matter, but what the heck does that have to do with the price to earnings multiple of bristol-meyers? nothing. that's what. yet this has been my mantra every time something bad happens in the world. as bristol-meyers is your classic defensive big pharma stock, company is going to keep growing no madder how badly the europeans screw up things because people always need their medicine. frankly, i think it's accelerating its growth. it's time to update this dictum to keep up with the times, old dog, new tricks. the big pharma stocks have been on a real ro
with a math or science base pattern that would be educational. by the way the new transit hub is scheduled to open in 2017. >>> time now 5:25. let's see how things are moving right now. sal, how are we looking? >> we are doing pretty well. we are off to an easy start. we never want to have any big problems. this morning we are getting cooperation from the freeways northbound 280 as you drive through there. also the manage commute is moving on very nicely. now back to steve. >>> 30s and 40s and some 50- degree temps on some of the lows. we are getting more of a westerly breeze. for some it's chilly to cold for others it's not that bad. 50 hayward. and also oakland. patchy low clouds as well. a lot of high clouds but mostly sun today. 50s and 60s or low 70s. >>> time now 5:26 the big that will event you. fulness plus camped out for a california's history. proposition 8 finally makes it to the u.s. supreme court. >>> we are live in san jose where police need your help tracking down a killer. >>> welcome back. this is ktvu channel 2 morning news it's mond
's no science here that we're seeing there's anything to that degree that make us worry in the united states. everything from our analysis shows that the united states' market is strong. we don't see any substantial fear to be worried about, and, quite frankly, the contagious risk is low. sandra: anybody in the target now riding this rally, jordan, you say, stay with it? >> right. at this point, we're near huh new highs, and the only thing to worry about is the pull back. we don't see anything suggesting we'd have a potential selloff or risk or see anything. sandra: we got to leave it there. peter quick, the last word. leave it this. >> yes, money is already taken out of our bank accounts. what do you call 0% interest rates? we're not getting it anymore. what about inflation? that's eroding the purchasing power of the savings. we have money taken out of the accounts, and, unfortunately, more out in the years ahead. sandra: peter, jordan, spencer, thank you very much. our paychecks are smaller, taking more out of the payroll check just to pay for what we've done in the country. thank you very
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. dennis: winter refusing to die. look at cleveland, ohio right now, just one of several cities getting hit by the latest snowstorm. we'll have more on the cost of this storm coming up. sandra: it's spring already, dennis. stocks now every 15 minutes. we have team coverage. dennis: the c.m.e., charles payne will show us how to make money on cyprus and nicole over at the indices. >> looking at the major market averages at the market. we see the dow, nasdaq and s&p 500 all lower. s&p 500 is down about a quarter of 1%, nasdaq down one third of 1%. dow jones the worst, down about half of 1%. we should note we've had a swing here today on wall street. about 136 points from top to bottom. we actually set a new intra day all-time record high this morning but then sold off on concerns of other european stories such as italy and we're seeing some of those spanish banks selling off so here you go. first you had a little optimism on the hopes of the cyprus bailout and then you started to learn here that
is it is better for children and all the social science shows that. "washingtonreed on press" yesterday. send us a clear it overturned in california with proposition 8 at the heart of one of two cases. you can see the line up. here is a photograph from paris. gay marriage upon it clashed with police. this is an issue not just here in the united states. hundreds of thousands of people poured into the center of the city residents plan to legalize gay marriage and adoption. a couple of other stories in the news this morning. this front page headline. higher risk of accidents and safety violations the increased risk for accidents that labs conducting research on potential buyer of terror terms such as anthrax because federal officials have failed to develop national standards for things like cloud design, construction and operation according to a new report. the va hopes digital finals will end the backlog of disability cases. we saw the head of the day on the sunday talk shows yesterday. he says he is committed to ending the backlog in 2015 by replacing -- by replacing paper with the electronic rec
of marriage institutions to me is not a science. it is not a cultural science. it is hypocrisy. the way you that you're saying if marriage social goal is to create more human beings, and why do we even let people who do not conceive of be married? you are not even let him be a bull or homosexual people to be married. ask them why we can help society? thing is the way your saturdays in our society duse just a man and women can get married to me it is the same not to a segregated society. based on what? are social goal of marriage is to reproduce -out- social a marriage history -- social goal is for marriage to reproduce? >> the time is up. we really need to get this down. to speak as to try quickly as possible. i have a lot of sympathy for mr. for letting it take its course. how deep into people who say this is taking too long and all of the gay couples in states where they did not have these rights, how you answer that/ what is your response to that? it is an anthropology that all social scientists recognize, people on the left, and this is not something i have come up with. this is the con
most of them have, if journalism and the social science surveys are reporting what's actually going on out there. >> yeah, and i think that there has to be a change. i think most americans have to recognize that the folks who run our enterprises, they had to learn how to do that. and we can all learn how to do that. it's the old argument in a sense that comes out of our history. >> here's a viewer named jeff chiming in. "dr. wolff, can you please give a concrete, not academic or theoretical explanation, of how you would apply your employee-run business model to a mcdonald's, wal-mart, a hospital or jpmorgan chase?" >> well, the answer is best given not as a hypothetical but to describe an enterprise which is large like all of those are, which has done this. >> there's a film called "shift change," about the cooperative efforts. and we'll provide a link to that. >> well, the example i'm going to give is a company in spain. it's called mondragon, the mondragon cooperative corporation. and a little history may interest folks. it was started in the middle of the 1950s by a catholic prie
human rights problem but then i read the science and realized that only of big human-rights problem but there was a foundation in ireland of climate justice that stars with injustice those that are these responsible. it is beginning to affect there is said disconnect but the other would be quite hard that is in to your generational justice. for a short period of time to take measures to curtail the carbon emissions and adapt with slow car been energy because already we have warned the world to a stage of climate shocks that we were headed for the 4 degrees world than it describes that it is catastrophic. the worst in porous parts affects everybody like the titanic. not just the people in steerage who survives. and that it is confusing people that we have forgotten about the people. but let me finish. i don't want to speak for too long. hopefully we have a question and answer but how i captured intergenerational justice. our first grandchild was born he is the older child of the daughter who helped me right. when the number one was born i had a physical reaction. somehow i read calib
to be inclusive. >> way too many people believe republicans are anti immigrant, anti woman, anti science, anti gay, anti worker and the list goes on and on and on. >> joe benenson was a poster for the obama campaign, president and founding partner of the benenson strategy group. and alex lund re is a republican polster who worked with mitt romney's campaign, vice president of target point consulting. let me first say it is a treat to have you both here for me. i'm thrilled. >> great to be here. >> it's a fascinating topic. let me start by showing some nbc wall street journal numbers to talk about the trend. so in 2004, the question was asked, do you favor or oppose same-sex marriage. 30% favor, 62% oppose. today, eight and a half years later, 51% favor, 40% oppose. let me start with you. the trend seems quite clear. am i missing something? i want to make sure we're painting the whole picture. >> no, you're not missing anything. it's a pretty spectacular time to be a student of public opinion. because we're in the midst of one of the most profound public opinion shifts in history right now. everyth
, however, the public generally views these space activities as little more than interesting science projects if they know about them at all. yet without them americans' lives would fundamentally change. let me explain with a few brief examples. gps is with the internet one of only two global utilities. it facilitates, for example, having emergency response vehicles reach their destinations by the shortest routes, potentially saving lives, for transoceanic air travel to be safer and more efficient because planes can fly closer together. and if the new satellite-reliant air traffic control system is implemented, reduce jet fuel consumption by one million barrels annually saving both money and the environment, and it saves the trucking industry an estimated $53 billion annually in fuel costs and better fleet management. in addition to the economic benefits of space which are vital to the national interest, there are also direct security implications. politically the recent meteor right that hit the russian yules with the force of an atomic bomb was a stark wake-up call regarding threat
in government spending. it does not take rocket science to understand that if the government of the largest single buyer of goods and services cuts back on the goods and services it buys, that means companies across america will sell less and they will have less need of workers and it will lay off workers. so this is in fact that worsens and employment is already severe. if you put that together with the tax increase on january 1 -- let me say a word about that. we heard a lot of public debate about taxing rich people and not taxing rich people, republicans and democrats, but the tax on the wealthy is small compared to the tax on the middle and lower incomes that went up january 1. when we raise the payroll tax from 4.2% to 6%, we raised over $125 billion, much more that was raised by taxing the rich, and we savaged the middle and lower income groups in america, those that in the presidential election both candidates had sworn to save and support. we attack them, thereby limiting their capacity to buy goods and services. you put together the taxing of the middle and lower incomes with the c
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. inside the five minute mark here. let's review. >> yep. >> headline risk is what they call it. looked like we were off to the races first thing this morning. dow was in all-time high territory. s&p was this close. then the dutch finance minister came out and said, you know that bailout deal we came up with yesterday, that could be a template for future deals here in europe. this is what the market did. we fell out of bed. a 50-point gain became a 100-some-odd-point decline. around 1:00 eastern time he came out and said, you know, maybe cyprus is a special situation. and the market did recover. but not everything that we had gained on the morning. we've gone sideways since then. we're coming back a little bit here, down 50 points. it took its toll on the euro. that's really what this is all about. remember, as the euro goes, so goes the u.s. equity market. and the euro was continuing lower on the feeling that maybe the cyprus bailout is a template, peter costa. what do you think? >> i don't t
science, moral authority, et cetera, was already with them. that the country had already decided. and the polling didn't always bear that out. the voting didn't always bear that out. in 2008 when prop 8 passed, it was such a shock and a blow because for years, the gay rights community was insisting that a state has evolved in liberalist california would never allow this to happen. so it was shocking. well, now i think that narrative has caught up to the insistence, the promise of that sea change might finally be here. so to jonathan capehart's point, maybe scotus doesn't see the need for its involvement. whatever you think of the issue, i can see capehart's point that they might be reluctant given the new narrative. >> i don't know how the citizenses will rule. i don't pretend to have any particular insight into their mind sets here. but another comparison that he reference in the his piece was a new york time article over the weekend about parallels with the row v. wade decision. and the idea that the roe v. wade decision was in some ways counterproductive. created a back lash a
for children and all the social science shows that. >> so liz, you talk about the complexity but here you have a conservative bringing it down to procreation and family. you have folks saying go after divorce. and try to fight, for example, the right to have a divorce as other posed to someone who wants to be married. in many cases they have children that they've adopted. >> i think actually, there are many people who are advocates of same sex marriage and the freedom to player why who would in fact argue that by allowing same sex couples the ability to get married and to have that relationship recognized by the state, you are actually strengthening the institution of marriage. that is certainly one of the arguments i would make and i think that is something you're going to hear a lot more of. >> let me bring you, i want to reed the comments in 1996 during the house debate on doma. comments made by congressman, this is in 1996. he said we are talking about human beings, people like you. people who want to get married, buy a house and spend their lives with the one they love. they've done no wr
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> are you paying more for pharmaceuticals than you really need to right now? the supreme court is trying to decide that very issue and so-called pay for delay case. pay for delay is when brand name drug companies pay their generic rivals to hold back on putting their cheaper drugs on the market. bertha coombs has more on this story. >> the federal trade commission arguing before the supreme court today calls those so-called pay for delay deals anti-trust violations. and they say they cheat consumers of the huge savings they can reap. the case before the court involves drug distributors and watson lab over the testosterone replacement drug. the firms reached a patent deal back in 2006 that keeps the generic off the shelves until 2015. the companies argue the agreement brings the drug to market actually five years before the patent actually expires. the industry argues more than 60% of patent cases are settled and consumers benefit because things do come to market sooner. they cite t
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